RawDigger 1.2.17

RawDigger 1.2.17

Changes/New features

  • Camera support added
    • Nikon D5600
    • Panasonic GX800/850/GF9
    • Sigma Quattro H
  • Support for DNG files with multiple images with different linearization data in one file and Magic Lantern "out of camera" DNG
  • Fixed some problems (display of some old Canon sRAWs, incorrect black level for Sony A350 etc.)
  • Handling of black level tag for Canon (Kodak) D2000C files and Sony A7RM2 files without black level metadata
  • Exiftool updated to version 10.40

RawDigger 1.2.16

RawDigger 1.2.16

Changes/New features

  • Exiftool updated to version 10.37
  • Camera support added:
    • Canon EOS M5
    • Google Pixel and Pixel XL
    • Hasselblad X1D and True Zoom
    • Olympus E-M1-mkII
    • Panasonic DMC-FZ2000/2500/FZH1, DMC-LX9/10/15
    • Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge
    • Sony ILCA-99M2 (A99-II), ILCE-6500
  • Fixed display problem with some (old) Canon sRAWs

The Importance of Establishing Correct Reference Point

ACR. Original RAW (ORF) File

Some Internet discussions claim that it is easier to push shadows up on one camera model compared to another one. Turns out, such an impression may result from a certain trick. First, let’s see the trick, and next we will expose it.

Let’s take a RAW file (from an Olympus E-M1, first version of the camera) and two DNGs derived from it via different means.

While the RAW data in those three files is totally identical, if those files are opened in Adobe Camera Raw the difference between them is immediately visible to the eye. Why is this?

We will answer this one without further ado: the difference is in the metadata!

Color Differences Between Cameras

RawDigger. Placing a Grid

When a new camera reaches the market one of the most discussed subjects is if the color it records is the same, better, or worse compared to a previous model. It often happens that the color is evaluated based on the rendering provided by some RAW converter. That is, an unknown parameter, that being the color profiles or transforms that a RAW converter uses for these models, comes into play. Another problem with such comparisons is that often they are based on shots taken with different lenses, under different light, and with effectively different exposures in RAW (while in fact the exposure settings itself may be the same).

Let's have a look how cameras compare in RAW if the set-up is kept very close to the same and the exposure in RAW is equalized.

RawDigger 1.2.15

RawDigger 1.2.15

Changes/New features

  • Exiftool updated to version 10.30
  • Camera support added:
    • Apple iPhone/iPad DNGs
    • Olympus E-PL8
    • Sony DSC-RX100V
    • Canon sRAW/mRAW format for modern cameras (80D, 5D4)
  • Better exiftool subprocess handling
  • Better handling of corrupted Foveon files
  • Additional integrity checks for Samsung NX files

Canon 5D Mark IV Dual Pixel Mode. Oh Yes, Highlights Are There!

RawDigger. Canon 5D Mark IV Dual Pixel mode. Main Frame

We've already received a lot of feedback where the effect of the highlights being preserved in the auxiliary subframe is attributed to the parallax and the razor-thin shape of the highlights in the still-life shot, not to what it really is: a ≈1 stop difference in clipping between main and auxiliary subframes.

Given the mechanism behind the formation and recording of dual-pixel raw data, there is no relation to the size or shape of the highlight area.

To give an example, please consider this photo by Calle Rosenqvist / Kamera & Bild, a dual-pixel raw taken at ISO 400, (you can download it from page 3 of the article, it is the street scene shot _91A0045.CR2). This is definitely not a case with some razor-thin highlights, it is a rather extensive blown out area that, as we will see, can be recovered using the data from the auxiliary subframe.

Canon Dual Pixel Technology: Gaining Additional Stop in Highlights

RawDigger. Canon 5D Mark IV Shot. Main Frame

Let's take a close look at a dual-pixel raw file from Canon 5D Mark IV using RawDigger 1.2.13

The dual-pixel raw contains 2 raw data sets, we will be calling them main subframe and auxiliary subframe.

We'll show that the difference between the main and auxiliary subframes is nearly 2x, or 1 stop, and that the auxiliary subframe can be used for highlight recovery (again, an additional 1 stop of highlights is preserved in the auxiliary subframe while it is clipped in the main subframe), effectively providing one more stop of the headroom in highlights; and the dual-pixel raw file for this camera contains 15 bits of raw data, if you consider main and auxiliary subframes together.

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