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The Importance of Establishing Correct Reference Point

ACR. Original RAW (ORF) File

Some Internet discussions claim that it is easier to push shadows up on one camera model compared to another one. Turns out, such an impression may result from a certain trick. First, we will see the trick, and next we will expose it.

If we compare two cameras (or different settings for the same camera; or even the same shot from the same camera but processed in different ways), and we’re doing this by looking at two files in a RAW converter, we need to:

  • either be sure that those two files were processed identically (and no, that doesn’t mean pushing the same buttons or moving the same sliders in a converter / converters);
  • or, if they WERE processed in different ways, understand exactly what the difference is and how to get to the lowest common denominator, if that’s the goal.

Color Differences Between Cameras

RawDigger. Placing a Grid

When a new camera reaches the market one of the most discussed subjects is if the color it records is the same, better, or worse compared to a previous model. It often happens that the color is evaluated based on the rendering provided by some RAW converter. That is, an unknown parameter, that being the color profiles or transforms that a RAW converter uses for these models, comes into play. Another problem with such comparisons is that often they are based on shots taken with different lenses, under different light, and with effectively different exposures in RAW (while in fact the exposure settings itself may be the same).

Let's have a look how cameras compare in RAW if the set-up is kept very close to the same and the exposure in RAW is equalized.

RawDigger 1.2.15

RawDigger 1.2.15

Changes/New features

  • Exiftool updated to version 10.30
  • Camera support added:
    • Apple iPhone/iPad DNGs
    • Olympus E-PL8
    • Sony DSC-RX100V
    • Canon sRAW/mRAW format for modern cameras (80D, 5D4)
  • Better exiftool subprocess handling
  • Better handling of corrupted Foveon files
  • Additional integrity checks for Samsung NX files

Canon 5D Mark IV Dual Pixel Mode. Oh Yes, Highlights Are There!

RawDigger. Canon 5D Mark IV Dual Pixel mode. Main Frame

We've already received a lot of feedback where the effect of the highlights being preserved in the auxiliary subframe is attributed to the parallax and the razor-thin shape of the highlights in the still-life shot, not to what it really is: a ≈1 stop difference in clipping between main and auxiliary subframes.

Given the mechanism behind the formation and recording of dual-pixel raw data, there is no relation to the size or shape of the highlight area.

To give an example, please consider this photo by Calle Rosenqvist / Kamera & Bild, a dual-pixel raw taken at ISO 400, (you can download it from page 3 of the article, it is the street scene shot _91A0045.CR2). This is definitely not a case with some razor-thin highlights, it is a rather extensive blown out area that, as we will see, can be recovered using the data from the auxiliary subframe.

Canon Dual Pixel Technology: Gaining Additional Stop in Highlights

RawDigger. Canon 5D Mark IV Shot. Main Frame

Let's take a close look at a dual-pixel raw file from Canon 5D Mark IV using RawDigger 1.2.13

The dual-pixel raw contains 2 raw data sets, we will be calling them main subframe and auxiliary subframe.

We'll show that the difference between the main and auxiliary subframes is nearly 2x, or 1 stop, and that the auxiliary subframe can be used for highlight recovery (again, an additional 1 stop of highlights is preserved in the auxiliary subframe while it is clipped in the main subframe), effectively providing one more stop of the headroom in highlights; and the dual-pixel raw file for this camera contains 15 bits of raw data, if you consider main and auxiliary subframes together.

RawDigger 1.2.13

RawDigger 1.2.13

Changes/New features

  • Exiftool updated to version 10.25
  • CGATS Export: additional grid description fields
  • Camera support added:
    • Canon 5D Mark IV (Dual Pixel RAW: use frame selection drop-down at program window bottom to select second frame)
    • Gitup GIT2
    • Several Android phone sensors

The Three Most Obvious Reasons to Look at RAW and Not Cull Based On Previews

"...Really, why do you even want to look at RAW files? The whole point of RAW is to be processed according to your taste into a JPEG. I never look at RAW files; I never need to. They are loaded into LR, processed, and I look at the processed images.”

FastRawViewer. Pink azaleas. JPEG prevew vs RAW

So here's a question - is it really necessary that one look at RAW when you're selecting RAW files, whether to convert or to present? Isn't a preview enough? You might not know exactly what settings were applied to it, but so what? What's so untrustworthy about embedded and rendered JPEGs and previews? And what's wrong with the preview and histogram on the back of the camera?

All these questions and more will be answered, and we intend on top of that to show how large of a gulf there is between real RAW data and the previews of it.

Very often images that are technically fine are being tossed out, and technically inferior ones are kept. Why? Because people aren't shown the truth about RAW. Here, we intend to show why people need to see and analyze actual RAW data, in advance of choosing which images to discard and which to keep and edit.

How to Use the Full Photographical Dynamic Range of Your Camera

FastRawViewer. Optimally exposed RAW

Consider the following scenario - you've just found out that your camera, at a certain ISO, has a dynamic range of 11 stops. Now, that's all well and good, but how does one go about using all 11 stops? It's not an automatic process, after all. Our answer? Expose optimally for RAW.

To elaborate on that a little, let's start by showing you the consequences of non-optimal exposure for RAW.

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